Given To The Sea

Given To The Sea

Book - 2017
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Khosa is destined to be sacrificed to the sea and struggles understand her destiny as the kingdom comes under attack and the ocean threatens to destroy them all.
Publisher: New York : G. P. Putnam's Sons, 2017.
ISBN: 9780399544613
Branch Call Number: FIC McGin
Characteristics: 345 pages ; 22 cm.

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selenium_dove_3
Sep 24, 2017

Okay, I'm going to be real honest with you here and say that i think this book's title, given to the sea, is incredibly appropriate, because this book SHOULD be given to the sea(mimes throwing book away into the ocean). Seriously, I'm not sure what kind of author wrote this, but for my b-day, I'd like to request a copy of this book. So I can burn it in the fireplace and roast marshmallows over the ashes of this incredibly horrible book.
#1 This book focuses mainly on...nothing. It's literally like a book about whatever these idiots do with their lives. There's no antagonist. No plot. Like, why should anyone care about this book? I've read sucky books before, but this book took by breath away completely. This is the suckiest book I have ever read. Literally, nothing would make me happier than to start a hate-club for this book.
#2 This puffed up Vincent the prince dude? He's an arrogant perverted snob who treats girls like dirt (he literally asked Dara to be his MISTRESS!) . One minute he's all like..I love Khosa because she looks hot in a crown!! Ahhhhhhh! True love!!!! Then he's all like whoa...because this lady chopped down a darn tree (the horror) I'm totally in love with her and want to kiss her. AND THEN he's in love with this baker's daughter who's spelling seriously sucks. And everything ends with him marrying Khosa, who is so disgusted with him that she literally (no kidding) vomits. In her cup. Oh yeah, sorry. SPOILER ALERT.
#3 It's, when you get down to it, a book about people who can't make their minds, wandering around worrying about who's in love with who. I mean, their all like, ooh, Vincent and-whoever-he's-in-love-with-now(I can't keep track) sitting in a tree, K-I-S-S-I-N-G, too stupid to remember that the world is LITERALLY ENDING!!!!
SUCKIEST. BOOK. EVER. ZERO STARS. DO NOT WASTE YOUR TIME READING THIS WITHOUT LOOKING MY REASONS OVER VERY CAREFULLY AND DECIDING YOU LIKE ALL OF THEM AND WANT TO READ THIS CRAPPY, SORRY EXCUSE FOR A BOOK. DO NOT WASTE YOUR TIME.

m
miraellie
Jul 10, 2017

90% sex, 10% actual good content. I've read romance novels less concerned about sex than this book was.

I'm uncertain if McGinnis meant to do a study of rape culture in a fantasy setting, but if she did, Given to the Sea fails miserably.

The truly annoying part, however, is that the world is just interesting enough and the stakes are high enough to be engaging, but the rushed pay off did not make it worth sticking with 300+ pages of "omg he/she is so pretty I wanna have all the sex with them but oh no I can't because of... reasons!!!!" Seriously, this book was way too focused on what/who everyone's genitals were doing and not the fact that their world is literally ending.

The thing was, I would have accepted the focus on the sex/desire if any of these characters had any interactions that made me believe they saw each other as human beings and not pretty people they want to sleep with. Donil is immediately attracted to Khosa, and she to him; Dara has supposedly been in love with Vincent for a while, but from the way she acts around him, you wouldn't know it. Vincent and Khosa had more development than any of the others, and yet I'm supposed to believe two interactions with Donil makes it unbearable for Khosa to consider saving her own life and running? No.

What a waste of a pretty solid concept.

m
marthabwaters
May 21, 2017

This was… interesting, and I’m not sure how I feel about it. It’s a complicated fantasy universe that McGinnis plunges you into, and the use of four POVs makes it no less confusing. (Equally confusing is her decision to use first person for two of those POVs, and third person for the other two – seriously, WHY?) And yet, something about this was really compelling. Without ever featuring anything more heated than a kiss, this book has a lot of sexual undertones, in ways that I found fascinating – the fact that the titular Given is expected to choose a mate and have a baby before flinging herself into the sea; the lingering threat of sexual violence throughout the book; all the various undercurrents between the different characters; etc. Definitely a read for older teens, rather than younger ones. Fans of Kendare Blake’s Three Dark Crowns will find this a similarly atmospheric read, and I have to give McGinnis credit – while I can’t be sure exactly how I felt about this, I am 100% certain I’ll read the sequel.

b
Brooke_Nicole
May 04, 2017

Pros:
- beautiful and emotional ending (near the end, tension builds quickly as conflicts climax and the diction McGinnis uses to describe these parts is stunning)
- some areas of the book seem to be written like a movie script (I love it)
- Dara is developed well as a character (and she is my favorite)

Cons:
- most of the book bored me (strong focus on the history of the world where I would rather see character development or imagery)

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Brooke_Nicole
May 05, 2017

Sexual Content: Sexual themes define this book, but aside from that, there are innuendos and an attempted rape scene.

b
Brooke_Nicole
May 05, 2017

Coarse Language: ~3 cuss words

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Brooke_Nicole
May 05, 2017

Brooke_Nicole thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

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